Chalmers United Church
Chalmers United Church

Chalmers Church was established in 1847, founded by sympathizers of the breakaway Free Church movement in Scotland, and named after its leader, the Reverend Thomas Chalmers. The present building was erected in 1890, and was known as the Chalmers Free Presbyterian Church. This it remained until 1925, when it joined the newly-formed United Church of Canada.

Chalmers United Church - InteriorChalmers United Church - Interior

In the 1860s, Chalmers Presbyterian Church (as it then was) made history by ordering the first organ in a Canadian Free Presbyterian Church: a two-manual encased organ by Hook and Hastings of Boston. Since Presbyterians at that time eschewed instrumental music in their worship, the organ became the subject of prolonged litigation between Chalmers Church and the national Synod. Eventually the organ was declared illegal, but by then tastes had changed and Presbyterians everywhere were bringing choirs and organs into their churches. In 1889 the present church building was begun, and a two-manual tracker instrument by the Warren firm of Montréal was installed, serving the church until 1938 — when it was replaced by a trendy new Hammond electronic organ, a change that was soon regretted.

Chalmers United Church - ChoirChalmers United Church - Choir

In 1960 the present Casavant organ was first installed. It was designed by Casavant’s tonal director, Lawrence Phelps, and soon received lots of use as one of the principal teaching organs for Queen’s School of Music. A major overhaul was accomplished in 1980, but a fire in the church in 1995 resulted in serious water damage to the organ, and so the following year it was subject to a major renovation by F.W. Knapton & Sons of Kingston, with a new console and digital additions by Classic Organs of Toronto. Further renovations ended in 2002, with the addition of six more ranks of pipes.

Chalmers United Church

Casavant Frères (1961)
F.W. Knapton & Son, additions in 1996, 2002)
Artisan-Classic Organs, additions in 2002)

Great

  •  1  Gedeckt 16 (under expression)
  •  2  Principal No. 1  8
  •  3  Principal No. 2  8 (under expression)
  •  4  Gemshorn 8 (under expression)
  •  5  Bourdon 8
  •  6  Principal 4 (under expression)
  •  7  Octave 4
  •  8  Koppelflöte 4
  •  9  Super Octave 2
  • 10 Mixture IV 1⅓
  • 10 Sharf Mixture III (under expression)
  • 12 Trompette 8 (under expression)
  • 13 Clarion 4 (under expression)
  • Great Unison Off
  • Swell to Great 8, 4
  • Positiv to Great 8, 4
  • Choir to Great 8, 4

Swell (under expression)

  • 14 Open Diapason 8
  • 15 Rohrflöte 8
  • 16 Viola 8
  • 17 Viola Celeste 8
  • 18 Nason Flute 4
  • 19 Spitzprincipal 4
  • 20 Waldflöte 2
  • 21 Italian Principal 2
  • 22 Cornet III 2⅔
  • 23 Plein Jeu III 2
  • 24 Scharff IV ⅔
  • 25 Fagott 16
  • 26 Hautboy 8
  • 27 Trompette 8
  • 28 Clarion 4
  • Swell Unison Off
  • Swell to Swell 4
  • Choir to Swell 8, 4
  • Tremulant

Positiv

  • 29 Gedeckt 8
  • 30 Nachthorn 4
  • 31 Principal 4
  • 32 Gemshorn 2
  • 33 Quintflöte 1⅓
  • 34 Sesquialtera II 2⅔
  • 35 Cymbal III ¼
  • 36 Krummhorn 8
  • Unison Off
  • Great to Positiv
  • Swell to Positiv 8, 4
  • Choir to Positiv 8, 4

Choir (under expression; floating division — plays only when coupled)

  • 37 Geigen Principal 8
  • 38 Stopped Diapason 8
  • 39 Dulciana 8
  • 40 Unda Maris
  • 41 Principal 4
  • 42 Spitzflöte 4
  • 43 Nazard 2⅔
  • 44 Recorder 2
  • 45 Tierce 1⅗
  • 46 Mixture II 1⅓
  • 47 Cremona 8
  • 48 Fanfare Trumpet 8
  • Tremulant

Pedal

  • 49 Contrabass 32
  • 50 Contrabourdon 32
  • 51 Open Diapason (wood) 16
  • 52 Principal 16
  • 53 Subbass 16
  • 54 Gedeckt 16
  • 55 Octave 16
  • 56 Pommer 8
  • 57 Superoctave 4
  • 58 Open flute 4 (prep)
  • 59 Gemshorn 2 (prep)
  • 60 Mixture IV 2⅔>
  • 61 Contra Posaune 32
  • 62 Basson 16
  • 63 Posaune 16
  • 64 Trumpet 8
  • Great to Pedal 8, 4
  • Swell to Pedal 8, 4
  • Positiv to Pedal 8, 4
  • Choir to Pedal 8, 4

Notes

S5 Box